03.28.2013Policy

This 90s-flavored nostalgia article on evolving technology will blow your mind!

By: Libby Jacobson

Alternate Title: More Things Kids Today Will Never Get to Experience

BuzzFeed, the popular Internet news/entertainment site, has made a name for itself by regularly posting content that appeals to Millennials' sense of nostalgia. On any given week, the site publishes a new "listicle" of toys, consumer products, and pop culture artifacts from the 80s and 90s. Last week, the site posted a list of "28 Things Kids Today Will Never Get to Experience," which included several references to outdated technologies that children born in this decade will likely never see. Examples included cassette tapes and other obsolete media formats, landline phones that tethered us to the wall with their tangled cords, and exhaustively slow dial-up internet services. Since we talk a lot about technological innovation and transition here, we thought of a few more things that today's kids just wouldn't understand, such as:

Killing time with the latest, most awesome (and only) game on your phone:


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"Social Gaming" actually used to require you to leave your house.


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Selling enough candy bars for a school fundraiser to score one of these bad boys from the prize catalog:


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You automatically knew which of your classmates were cool, because their parents got them a separate phone line.


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Speaking of cool, remember storing your friends' phone numbers in one of these?


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Or those quirky, star-studded TV commercials for collect calling services?

Occasionally, you could find a hidden treasure inside one of these:


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And let's be honest: you felt like the ultimate teenage rebel whenever you did this.


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About the author(s): 

Libby Jacobson focuses on social, digital and external communications for Verizon’s federal legislative, regulatory, and public policy teams. Libby is also the curator and editor of Verizon’s Public Policy blog, the hub for Verizon’s positions on regulatory and legal issues surrounding the information and communications technology industry. Before joining Verizon in 2012, Libby learned the digital communications craft as an analyst with a DC-area, social media PR firm, while moonlighting as a blogger. Libby lives and works in Washington DC, and is a Verizon FiOS enthusiast.