10.28.1998Corporate

Bell Atlantic Praises Passage of Copyright Law

Bell Atlantic Praises Passage of Copyright Law

President Clinton today will sign into law important legislation that guarantees consumers the ability to receive quality, high-speed access to information on the Internet.


October 28, 1998





Media
contact:

Susan Butta,
202-336-7883


WASHINGTON -- President Clinton today will sign into law
important legislation that guarantees consumers the ability to receive
quality, high-speed access to information on the Internet. The law also
allows Bell Atlantic to continue to offer services customers have grown to
expect - including online directories, web links and web hosting - without
the fear of unjustified litigation.

"Passage of the Copyright Act is a watershed event for Internet
users. Without legal uncertainties, companies like Bell Atlantic can deliver
information to consumers at the highest speeds possible by deploying the
most efficient technologies, thus avoiding the 'World Wide Wait'," said
Tom Tauke, senior vice president for Government Relations at Bell
Atlantic. "We applaud the foresight of the members of Congress who
supported this bill and in so doing encouraged the unencumbered growth
of the Internet."

Bell Atlantic.net sm Internet access subscribers using links powered
by Infospeed sm DSL, for example, will be able to access information at
blazing speeds without having to rely heavily on the congested Internet
backbone. "Popular Web sites and material for Bell Atlantic.net customers
will be temporarily held in local sites, not in computers 20 hops away
across the Internet on the other side of the continent or some other remote
location," said Amy McIntosh, vice president, Consumer Marketing for
Bell Atlantic.

"Media historians will one day look back upon this event and
compare it to the day when the cable industry won the right to retransmit
local broadcast signals," said Mcintosh. "Today Bell Atlantic can
guarantee that its customers will receive benefit from its high-speed
services, like ADSL, from our local servers, even if there are bottlenecks
that continue to clog traffic on the rest of the Internet."