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What is IPv6?

The next generation of IP address space is IPv6, which contains many more features like enhanced security, and a virtually limitless number of addresses.

The following is an example of a valid IPv6 address: 2001:CDBA:0000:0000:0000:0000:3257:9652

To best serve our customers during this time, Verizon is rolling out IPv6 address space in a "dual stack" mode – where IPv4 and IPv6 addresses are both loaded.

Learn about IPv6

What is IPv6?

As we all know, technology changes daily. The number and types of devices using the Internet have increased dramatically in recent years and, as a result, address space for these devices is being rapidly exhausted. Today’s technology for IP addresses is referred to as IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4). The IP addresses aligned with IPv4 are expected to be depleted at some point in the near future. The next generation of IP address space is IPv6, which contains many more features like enhanced security, and a virtually limitless number of addresses. Unfortunately, most servers and other Internet devices will not be speaking IPv6 for a while. IPv4 will remain an entrenched standard for some time to come.

To best serve our customers during this time, Verizon is rolling out IPv6 address space in a "dual stack" mode – where IPv4 and IPv6 addresses are both loaded. The company will maintain IPv4 for those servers continuing to use that standard, and IPv6 for servers using this latest standard. The dual stack approach applies to both existing and new Verizon customers.

Frequently asked questions

  • What is IPv4 depletion?

  • Simply put, the industry as a whole (not just Verizon) will at some point run out of IPv4 addresses, which is when IPv6 will come into use.

  • What does an IPv6 address look like? And how is it different from an IPv4 address?

  • An IPv6 address contains a combination of both letters and numbers (0 through 9, and A through F). A typical IPv6 address will have 8 groups of up to four letters and numbers separated by colons, instead of the 4 groups of three numbers separated by periods found in IPv4 addresses today.

    The following is an example of a valid IPv6 address: 2001:CDBA:0000:0000:0000:0000:3257:9652

    Compared to this IPv4 address example: 24.128.21.12.

  • How will Verizon support IPv6 access or content? Can I still use IPv4?

  • Verizon is currently in the process of upgrading our Fios network to allow for the routing of IPv6 traffic in addition to the current IPv4 traffic, which is referred to as dual stack mode. Customers will continue to have access to the same content and services they currently have. The IPv6 upgrades will allow users to access additional IPv6 content going forward.

  • What if I have high speed internet (DSL)?

  • Our DSL network is in the process of being upgraded for dual stack mode. Many of the same guidelines for Fios will apply to DSL when we move to Dual Stack IPv4/IPv6 in regards to availability and customer equipment. Check back for more information.

  • What if I have a static IP address?

  • Fios static IP address customers (business customers) will be assigned an IPv6 address in selected locations. Verizon will use a IPv6/56 address format, which means this will support 56 LANs.

  • Where is IPv6 available?

  • Dual stack IPv4/IPv6 will be launched in various areas within Verizon’s Fios network. Check back for more information.

  • Is IPv6 something a customer orders?

  • No, IPv6 is a network functionality that Verizon and other companies are implementing.

  • Will I need to change my Fios router equipment for IPv6?

  • To access an IPv6-only website, you will need an IPv6 compatible router. The Verizon Fios Quantum Gateway (model G1100) and Actiontec Gen 2 and Gen 3 broadband home routers (model MI424WR revisions E, F, G, I) are compatible with IPv6. If your router does not support IPv6, you can purchase an IPv6 compatible Fios router on our e- commerce site.

    Fios Routers Models IPv6 Capable
    D-Link 4 Port Wired VDI604 distributed Q3 2004 - Q3 2006 No
    D-Link 4 Port Wireless VDI624 distributed in Q3 2004- Q3 2006 No
    Actiontec 8 Port Wired Router RI408 distributed in Q3 2006 -Q4 2008 No
    Actiontec BHR1 MI424WR Distributed in Q2 2006- Q4 2011 No
    Westell ADSL2 Gateway 9100VM distributed Q4 2008 - Q3 2011 No
    Westell BHR2 9100EM distributed in Q3 2008 through Present No
    Actiontec BHR2 MI424WR Rev E, F distributed in Q1 2009 through Present Yes
    Actiontec BHR3 MI424WR Rev G, I distributed in Q1 2009 through Present Yes
    Fios Quantum Gateway G1100, distributed in Q4 2014 through Present Yes
  • Will I lose my ability to access the internet during the change to IPv4/IPv6 dual stack?

  • No, your ability to access the internet will not change as a result of this Fios network upgrade. All the content that is currently available to you via IPv4 will continue to be available. When the Fios network upgrade is complete and you have an IPv6 capable router, you will be able to view both IPv4 and IPv6 content. (Note: There is a remote possibility that you will not be able to access some sites that are IPv6 only until your area has been made dual stack IP (IPv4/IPv6) capable and you have an IPv6 capable router. IPv6-only websites currently represents less than 1% of what is available on the Internet.)

  • What will happen if I try to reach an IPv6 website today?

  • If you attempt to connect to an IPv6-only website with your Verizon service today, you will receive an error message in your browser indicating that a communication error has occurred and you are unable to route to the host. You will receive this message until your area has been changed to dual stack IPv6/IPv4

  • Are we out of IPv4 addresses?

  • No, Verizon is not out of IPv4 addresses and we will be able to continue to provide IPv4 functionality and static IP (business customers) addresses.

  • Can Fios customers test IPv6 from their Verizon network?

  • Yes, you can visit a third-party site to check your full IPv6 connectivity.

  • Where can I get more information about IPv6?

  • Will IPv6 impact DNS assist?

  • No, it will continue to work the same way.

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